Tide Bites

tidebites

Petra turning rocks to collect Northern Clingfish at Cattle Point Beach - C. Linkem photo

Petra turning rocks to collect Northern Clingfish at Cattle Point Beach – C. Linkem photo

Here’s an excerpt from this month’s University of Washington Labs Tide Bites newsletter, written by Petra Ditsche…

Years ago when I stepped into a river and experienced the strong forces of the current, I wondered how animals are able to live in such a challenging environment. This experience stayed with me, and the interplay of currents and animals is still one of my main research interests today.

Clingfishes are small fish that usually live in shallow water or the marine intertidal. The ~110 known species of this family can be found almost all around the world. While most fish swim freely in the water or rest on the bottom, a few species have attachment “devices” to cling to substrate surfaces. What makes clingfishes special is the suction disc on their belly. This feature gave this fish family its name. Click to read more

Posted on March 10, 2015 at 5:52 am by

Categories: Around Here, Enviro Corner

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